Things I learned from NaNo 2016

Now that Nanowrimo is officially over, you’d think I’d want to not even hear the word for the next thirty days. Instead, I’ve been pondering it, lol.

Things I learned this year:

  • Plantsing is fun. I had no plot, no characters, and it took me the entire first day to figure out what I was going to write, which was fucking scary. It took off from there, though, and it was really fun to write. By the end of the first week, I knew the plot, but didn’t write it out. It was freeing, but I know that if I didn’t write out plot ideas, I’d eventually forget them; not fun.
  • I stole from other stories (mostly mine, lol) to shore up gaps. I named my main characters after some of my favourite book characters so I had a mental image for how my characters would behave/look. I grabbed concepts from my own stories (technically I wasn’t using them anyway, right?) so my characters had things to do.
  • Finishing a story feels weird. I know where the story goes next; but as it stands, it’s done. I feel odd, like I should be doing the next story of it already. Maybe it’s the fact that it’s only 50,000ish words; I’m used to my stories taking twice that to reach the climax. Of course, I do have a couple of sections that didn’t get written; I realized certain areas were too thin, and needed more, but didn’t want to backtrack during NaNo. And there might be one extra scene to throw in at the end… so it’s 95% done, lol.
  • I still get a lot of words written with sex scenes. This is good for NaNo, but extremely discomforting when your kids ask why they can’t read your story.
  • While I was trying to pick a plot, I ended up really advancing several of my more vague story ideas. They may not be written, but now they have a concrete shape. Nothing works better for the creative process than desperation!
  • Working with a rather free-form plotline, and succeeding,  has reinvigorated my desire to write. I am going to try and start having regular writing nights, maybe three a week. I’m terrible at daily writing; I burn out too quickly. But three a week might just be doable.
  • Writing buddies are necessary. During Nanowrimo I’m competitive enough to keep pushing my word count if others are ahead of me. We also had local meetups, and being able to chat about the story as it progressed really helped. I got some very excellent ideas from the brainstorming, and hopefully didn’t bore them too much with my own suggestions. The locals have decided to do a monthly critique group, which might just help keep me going.